1707 – Amulet: Charm

Physical description:
Triangular amulet made of brown fabric and cord, decorated with brass leaf-shapes, white glass beads etc, with yellow and blue glass beads on the cord. With a written charm that was originally inside the amulet.
Museum classification:
Protection
Size:
70 x 15 x 270 long inc cord
Information:

The decoration on this amulet is interesting and complex. There are three shiny brass leaf-shapes, plus a pink metal disc, and in the centre what looks like a green plastic button with gold decoration. There are also twelve white glass beads and a number of tiny metal springs, perhaps intended to confuse bad luck with their spiral shape. The cord is also twisted into a spiral and tied with three knots, and sixteen rather beautiful ring-shaped glass beads are strung on it - eight blue and eight yellow. The amulet has been slit open to remove the written charm (in Arabic) that was contained inside it, which is now displayed alongside it. The inside of the amulet appears to be padded, perhaps with herbs or other magical substances.
The placing of a written charm inside a fabric bag, which is then worn, is a widespread and ancient practice, often used by British cunning folk. Elaborate triangular amulets like this are common in the Middle East, and may be stitched on to clothing or hung up inside the home.

See also the amulets MoWaM id. nos. 1970 and 2398.

Resource:
Object
Materials:
Fabric, paper, glass, metal
Copyright ownership:
Treetrunk Ltd

The decoration on this amulet is interesting and complex. There are three shiny brass leaf-shapes, plus a pink metal disc, and in the centre what looks like a green plastic button with gold decoration. There are also twelve white glass beads and a number of tiny metal springs, perhaps intended to confuse bad luck with their spiral shape. The cord is also twisted into a spiral and tied with three knots, and sixteen rather beautiful ring-shaped glass beads are strung on it - eight blue and eight yellow. The amulet has been slit open to remove the written charm (in Arabic) that was contained inside it, which is now displayed alongside it. The inside of the amulet appears to be padded, perhaps with herbs or other magical substances.
The placing of a written charm inside a fabric bag, which is then worn, is a widespread and ancient practice, often used by British cunning folk. Elaborate triangular amulets like this are common in the Middle East, and may be stitched on to clothing or hung up inside the home.

See also the amulets MoWaM id. nos. 1970 and 2398.