1947 – Horse Brass: Amulet

Physical description:
Crescent-shaped horse brass.
Museum classification:
Protection
Size:
85 x 70 x 5
Information:

The Horniman Museum has a similar horse brass, collected in Surrey by Edward Lovett, which the label says was carried by a soldier as an amulet during World War I, and which is also described as a "lunar object".

Divination by throwing horse brasses on the ground is mentioned in Nigel Pearson's book 'The Devil's Plantation', and also featured in the cult 70s television series 'The Moon Stallion' (which also included a depiction of the Toad Bone Ritual used to obtain power over horses). Horse brass divination was included in a discussion of Museum objects at the May Event at the Wellington Hotel in 2016. Participants were sceptical about how practical it would be, but there was an interesting general discussion about horse brasses. It was felt that horse brasses definitely began as protection amulets, but that over time they became status symbols, with some horse brasses even being manufactured as promotional gifts by companies whose customers worked with horses. When cars became popular horse-shoe-shaped horse brasses were specially made to be attached to the grills or bumpers of cars to give the same kind of combination of good luck and status to cars. It was agreed that the oldest types of horse brasses are ones that feature designs such as moons, suns and hearts. Edward Lovett discusses the magical significance of horse brasses in his book 'Magic in Modern London'.

Resource:
Object
Materials:
Metal - Brass
Copyright ownership:
Treetrunk Ltd.

The Horniman Museum has a similar horse brass, collected in Surrey by Edward Lovett, which the label says was carried by a soldier as an amulet during World War I, and which is also described as a "lunar object".

Divination by throwing horse brasses on the ground is mentioned in Nigel Pearson's book 'The Devil's Plantation', and also featured in the cult 70s television series 'The Moon Stallion' (which also included a depiction of the Toad Bone Ritual used to obtain power over horses). Horse brass divination was included in a discussion of Museum objects at the May Event at the Wellington Hotel in 2016. Participants were sceptical about how practical it would be, but there was an interesting general discussion about horse brasses. It was felt that horse brasses definitely began as protection amulets, but that over time they became status symbols, with some horse brasses even being manufactured as promotional gifts by companies whose customers worked with horses. When cars became popular horse-shoe-shaped horse brasses were specially made to be attached to the grills or bumpers of cars to give the same kind of combination of good luck and status to cars. It was agreed that the oldest types of horse brasses are ones that feature designs such as moons, suns and hearts. Edward Lovett discusses the magical significance of horse brasses in his book 'Magic in Modern London'.