388 – Hegemon’s Wand

Physical description:
Golden Dawn ceremonial staff with golden bishop's mitre at top and red shaft.
Museum classification:
Ritual Magic
Size:
c 1000 long
Information:

Mitre Headed Sceptre or the Hegemon’s Wand: ‘the sceptre of wisdom’.  Israel Regardie.  For more details on the meaning and symbolism of this wand, see Israel Regardie's Complete Golden Dawn in the Museum library.

One of a set of 4, together with 1413, 1414 and 1415.
Possibly made by George Alexander. A catalogue and price list of magical artefacts made by him, showing a staff very like this one, is held in the museum archive.

The image below is taken from Kenneth and Steffi Grant's book "Hidden Lore: Hermetic Glyphs" in the Museum library.

These objects are unconsecrated (they have no Latin motto on them indicating who used them) and have been on display in the Museum for a long time, see photos below: black and white photos show displays in Cecil Williamson's time (1960-1996), colour photos show displays created by Graham King (1996-2014).  In 2018, these objects appeared in the Museum's exhibition "Dew of Heaven: Objects of Ritual Magic" (photograph at the bottom).

 

Resource:
Object
Materials:
Wood, metal

Mitre Headed Sceptre or the Hegemon’s Wand: ‘the sceptre of wisdom’.  Israel Regardie.  For more details on the meaning and symbolism of this wand, see Israel Regardie's Complete Golden Dawn in the Museum library.

One of a set of 4, together with 1413, 1414 and 1415.
Possibly made by George Alexander. A catalogue and price list of magical artefacts made by him, showing a staff very like this one, is held in the museum archive.

The image below is taken from Kenneth and Steffi Grant's book "Hidden Lore: Hermetic Glyphs" in the Museum library.

These objects are unconsecrated (they have no Latin motto on them indicating who used them) and have been on display in the Museum for a long time, see photos below: black and white photos show displays in Cecil Williamson's time (1960-1996), colour photos show displays created by Graham King (1996-2014).  In 2018, these objects appeared in the Museum's exhibition "Dew of Heaven: Objects of Ritual Magic" (photograph at the bottom).