1412 – Phoenix Wand Was-sceptre

Physical description:
Golden Dawn ceremonial staff with gold painted bird-like head at top and striped shaft. Based on an Ancient Egyptian staff topped with a stylised representation of the head of the god Set.
Museum classification:
Ritual Magic
Size:
c 1000 mm long
Information:

One of a set of 3, together with 386 and 1411. The Phoenix wand, also referred to as the was sceptre, is a symbol that often appears on relics, art, and hieroglyphics associated with ancient Egypt. On he wand, it appears as an animal's head at the top of a long straight staff with a forked end. The staff itself is coloured according to the Kabbalistic / Rosicrucian tradition, as pictured below. While the wand in its Was sceptre context is associated with the deity Set, the Phoenix wand in The Golden Dawn system is associated with Osiris. 

 

One source describes this wand as the following:

"The Phoenix-headed Wand is the implement of the Second Adept who represents the active, fiery  masculine principle and the Sephirah of Geburah.

The ancient Egyptians worshiped the phoenix, which they called the bennu, a heron-like bird. This bird was supposed to have created itself, and to have come into existence from out of the fire which burned on top of the sacred Persea Tree of Heliopolis. The bennu was essentially a solar bird and was a symbol of the dawning sun and the dead sun-god, Osiris, to whom the animal was sacred, and from whose heart it sprang. The bennu represented the birth of the sun each morning from the dead sun of yesterday. In addition it became the symbol of the resurrection of mankind, because humanity’s spiritual essence was believed to spring forth from the dead physical body.

The Phoenix-headed Wand is the implement of the Second Adept who represents the active, fiery  masculine principle and the Sephirah of Geburah. The wand is used in the 5=6 Ceremony to bring into action the powers of life and the vital heat of existence. The Phoenix Wand is a very powerful implement that can be used by an Adept whenever the fiery powers of Geburah are called for. It can also be used to invoke, charge or banish the forces of the seven planets. The fiery nature of this wand gives special strength and authority to any magical operation undertaken. The wand ends in two prongs which in ancient times was used to pin down poisonous snakes."

 

This wand is also featured in the Hidden Lore: Hermetic Glyphs by Kenneth and Steffi Grant, pictured below in The Equinox by Aleister Crowley.

 

The table below illustrates how the zodiac, colours, and other features correspond with each other. 

 

This wand is also featured in the Hidden Lore: Hermetic Glyphs by Kenneth and Steffi Grant, pictured below.

 

This and the other two wands feature in Aleister Crowley's Thoth tarot card deck, as pictured below, which is described in his book The Book of Thoth: A Short Essay on the Tarot of the Egyptians. 

 

Additionally, Kenneth Grant's The Magical Revival offers a further interpretation of the symbolism of the Phoenix and the wand.

 

 

The term "Second Adept" refers to the grading in the second order.

The structure of the Golden Dawn:

First Order
Introduction—Neophyte 0=0
Zelator 1=10
Theoricus 2=9
Practicus 3=8
Philosophus 4=7
Intermediate—Portal Grade

Second Order
Adeptus Minor 5=6
Adeptus Major 6=5
Adeptus Exemptus 7=4

Third Order
Magister Templi 8=3
Magus 9=2
Ipsissimus 10=1

 


Possibly made by George Alexander. A catalogue and price list of magical artefacts made by him, showing a staff very like this one, is held in the museum archive.

Resource:
Object
Materials:
Wood
Copyright ownership:
Treetrunk Ltd

One of a set of 3, together with 386 and 1411. The Phoenix wand, also referred to as the was sceptre, is a symbol that often appears on relics, art, and hieroglyphics associated with ancient Egypt. On he wand, it appears as an animal's head at the top of a long straight staff with a forked end. The staff itself is coloured according to the Kabbalistic / Rosicrucian tradition, as pictured below. While the wand in its Was sceptre context is associated with the deity Set, the Phoenix wand in The Golden Dawn system is associated with Osiris. 

 

One source describes this wand as the following:

"The Phoenix-headed Wand is the implement of the Second Adept who represents the active, fiery  masculine principle and the Sephirah of Geburah.

The ancient Egyptians worshiped the phoenix, which they called the bennu, a heron-like bird. This bird was supposed to have created itself, and to have come into existence from out of the fire which burned on top of the sacred Persea Tree of Heliopolis. The bennu was essentially a solar bird and was a symbol of the dawning sun and the dead sun-god, Osiris, to whom the animal was sacred, and from whose heart it sprang. The bennu represented the birth of the sun each morning from the dead sun of yesterday. In addition it became the symbol of the resurrection of mankind, because humanity’s spiritual essence was believed to spring forth from the dead physical body.

The Phoenix-headed Wand is the implement of the Second Adept who represents the active, fiery  masculine principle and the Sephirah of Geburah. The wand is used in the 5=6 Ceremony to bring into action the powers of life and the vital heat of existence. The Phoenix Wand is a very powerful implement that can be used by an Adept whenever the fiery powers of Geburah are called for. It can also be used to invoke, charge or banish the forces of the seven planets. The fiery nature of this wand gives special strength and authority to any magical operation undertaken. The wand ends in two prongs which in ancient times was used to pin down poisonous snakes."

 

This wand is also featured in the Hidden Lore: Hermetic Glyphs by Kenneth and Steffi Grant, pictured below in The Equinox by Aleister Crowley.

 

The table below illustrates how the zodiac, colours, and other features correspond with each other. 

 

This wand is also featured in the Hidden Lore: Hermetic Glyphs by Kenneth and Steffi Grant, pictured below.

 

This and the other two wands feature in Aleister Crowley's Thoth tarot card deck, as pictured below, which is described in his book The Book of Thoth: A Short Essay on the Tarot of the Egyptians. 

 

Additionally, Kenneth Grant's The Magical Revival offers a further interpretation of the symbolism of the Phoenix and the wand.

 

 

The term "Second Adept" refers to the grading in the second order.

The structure of the Golden Dawn:

First Order
Introduction—Neophyte 0=0
Zelator 1=10
Theoricus 2=9
Practicus 3=8
Philosophus 4=7
Intermediate—Portal Grade

Second Order
Adeptus Minor 5=6
Adeptus Major 6=5
Adeptus Exemptus 7=4

Third Order
Magister Templi 8=3
Magus 9=2
Ipsissimus 10=1

 


Possibly made by George Alexander. A catalogue and price list of magical artefacts made by him, showing a staff very like this one, is held in the museum archive.