275 – Vagina stone

Physical description:
Stone (geode) that looks like a vagina.
Museum classification:
Herbs and Healing
Size:
100mm
Information:
Original text by Cecil Williamson: 'Joan Long's famous vagina stone. Joan was a travelling person working the west country in various seasonable trades. On the side she had "power" to see the future, to work curative spells and the best money spinner of all - to find solutions to a wide range of human problems - be they drinking or impotency and all that lies between. This strange, naturally formed stone was part of a wide range of Joan's rituals. She had a good sense of humour and called the stone her fanny stone or her funny stone. Many of her country clients called it by a crisp, down-to-earth four lettered word. Acquired 1961.' Thomas Nicols, in his 'Lapidary' (1652) describes stones very similar to this, and says they were used to aid childbirth and prevent miscarriage; also that it was believed they had "a power of procuring love, of increasing riches, and of making men victorious." A powder from them was also sometimes used in a thief detection ritual. It was mixed with flour and used to make bread, which was then given to the suspect to eat, while a charm was said. If the suspect was guilty, the bread would choke them. According to 'The Book of Secrets of Albertus Magnus' (13th C., trans. 16th C.), "The stone which is called Aetites' containeth always another stone in it'. This stone, hanged up in the left shoulder, getteth love between the husband and his wife. It is profitable to women great with child; it letteth [prevents] untimely birth."
Resource:
Object
Materials:
Stone
Copyright ownership:
Copyright to The Museum of Witchcraft Ltd.
Original text by Cecil Williamson: 'Joan Long's famous vagina stone. Joan was a travelling person working the west country in various seasonable trades. On the side she had "power" to see the future, to work curative spells and the best money spinner of all - to find solutions to a wide range of human problems - be they drinking or impotency and all that lies between. This strange, naturally formed stone was part of a wide range of Joan's rituals. She had a good sense of humour and called the stone her fanny stone or her funny stone. Many of her country clients called it by a crisp, down-to-earth four lettered word. Acquired 1961.' Thomas Nicols, in his 'Lapidary' (1652) describes stones very similar to this, and says they were used to aid childbirth and prevent miscarriage; also that it was believed they had "a power of procuring love, of increasing riches, and of making men victorious." A powder from them was also sometimes used in a thief detection ritual. It was mixed with flour and used to make bread, which was then given to the suspect to eat, while a charm was said. If the suspect was guilty, the bread would choke them. According to 'The Book of Secrets of Albertus Magnus' (13th C., trans. 16th C.), "The stone which is called Aetites' containeth always another stone in it'. This stone, hanged up in the left shoulder, getteth love between the husband and his wife. It is profitable to women great with child; it letteth [prevents] untimely birth."